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The 13th World Conference on Tobacco OR Health

Building capacity for a tobacco-free world

July 12-15, 2006, Washington, DC, USA



Thursday, July 13, 2006 - 12:00 PM
13-113

Does Depressive Symptomatology Mediate the Association between Smoking and Trait Anxiety?

Róbert Urbán, PhD and Attila Oláh. Department of Personality and Health Psychology, Eötvös Loránd University Budapest, Izabella u 46., Budapest, Hungary

Objective: While the association between depressive symptomatology and smoking is well established, the association between smoking and trait anxiety is only partly supported. Depression and anxiety are different but closely related constructs, the common core of them is the tendency to experience general distress. We hypothesize that depression symptomatology mediates the association between smoking and trait anxiety. Exploring the correlation between smoking and components of depressive symptomatology (somatic, cognitive and behavioral symptoms) is also a goal of this poster.

Methods: In a cross-sectional questionnaire study, 574 young Hungarian males participated. The mean age was 20.7 years (SD=1.77). Current smoking status and smoking history were measured with self-reports. Psychometric scales were used to measure depressive symptomatology (Beck Depression Inventory) and trait anxiety (STAI). A series of logistic regression analysis was used to test this mediation hypothesis.

Results: Trait anxiety was associated with smoking (OR=1.69 [1.17-2.45]), and depression was also associated with smoking (OR=2.10 [1.37-3.22]) in univariate analyses. After entering the depression into the regression association between smoking and anxiety became non-significant (OR=1.37 [0.91-2.04]), while association between depression and smoking decreased only slightly (OR=1.84 [1.15-2.94]). Our hypothesis is supported. Association between smoking and anxiety can be explained by the association between anxiety and depression. The impact of anxiety on smoking might be due to the common core of both construct, namely the general distress.