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The 13th World Conference on Tobacco OR Health

Building capacity for a tobacco-free world

July 12-15, 2006, Washington, DC, USA



Thursday, July 13, 2006 - 12:00 PM
13-212

Smoking Cessation Program as Tool for Early Diagnosis of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Ilda Godoy, PhD1, Suzana Erico Tanni, MD2, Rosana dos Santos E. Silva Martin, RN1, and Irma Godoy, MD, PhD3. (1) Nursing Department, Botucatu School of Medicine, UNESP, Departamento de Enfermagem, Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Botucatu, 18618-000, Brazil, (2) Emergency Department and Pulmonary Division, Botucatu School of Medicine, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Botucatu, 18618-000, Brazil, (3) Internal Medicine /Pulmonary Division, Botucatu School of Medicine, UNESP, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Botucatu, 18618-000, Brazil

Objective: This study aimed to verify if the inclusion of pulmonary function test in evaluation of patients submitted to a smoking cessation program can contribute to early diagnosis of COPD.

Methods: A retrospective analysis of the medical records of 157 smokers attending the smoking cessation program (Botucatu Medical School, São Paulo, Brazil), from January 2003 to November 2005, was performed. Subjects were older than 40 y (mean age: 55± 8,5 y) and 64,7% female. Clinical and radiographic data, previous medical diagnosis and lung function were analysed.

Results: Fifty-six (35,9%) smokers fulfilled the criteria for the diagnosis of COPD; 16,1% classified as severe. Eighteen (11,5%) smokers had previous COPD diagnosis confirmed; 56% with disease mild/moderate and 44% with severe disease. Seven patients previously diagnosed as COPD presented lung function results not compatible with the disease diagnosis criteria. Thirty-eight new COPD diagnosis were made; 97% in the mild//moderate stage and 3% with severe disease. Twenty-seven smokers (17,2%) presented forced expiratory volume to force vital capacity ratio (FEV1/FVC) higher than 70% and lower than the reference values; fourteen (51,9%) presenting cough and sputum characterizing a population in risk for development of COPD. Conclusion: Inclusion of lung function tests in the initial evaluation of smokers admitted to smoking cessation programs may be an useful tool to improve the early diagnosis of COPD.