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The 13th World Conference on Tobacco OR Health

Building capacity for a tobacco-free world

July 12-15, 2006, Washington, DC, USA



Thursday, July 13, 2006 - 12:00 PM
13-30

The Effect of Maternal Narghile (Waterpipe or Hookah) Smoking on Neonatal Weight and Delivery Outcomes

Alireza Mirahmadizadeh, MD, &, MPH, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Unit 3, No 37, Farhang hoseini Alley,, Valiasr Ave, Tehran, Tehran, Iran, Nouzar Nakhaee, MD, MPH, Community Medicine, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Unit 3, No 37, Farhang hoseini Alley,, Valiasr Ave, Tehran, tehran, Iran, Seddighe Amini-Ranjbar, MD, Pediatric Gastroenterology, Kerman University of Medical Sciences., Unit 3, No 37, Farhang hoseini Alley,, Valiasr Ave, Tehran, Tehran, Iran, and Ali Baseri, Pediatric Gastroenterology, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Unit 3, No 37, Farhang hoseini Alley,, Valiasr Ave, Tehran, Tehran, Iran.

Objective: To identify the impact of maternal waterpipe smoking on delivery outcome (mode of delivery, Preterm birth, birth weight, head circumference, and stillbirth).

Methods: This study was conducted in rural areas of the most prevalent Province regarding water pipe smoking i.e. the Booshehr Province, located on the south-west of Iran. We conducted a population-based. Multiple- regression method was used to study the associations between the independent (prenatal water pipe smoke exposure) and control variables and the dependent variable (birth weight).

Results: Of 2808 pregnant women 8 percent (n=224, 95% CI, 7-9%) were water pipe smokers. 11.5% (n=322) were exposed to cigarette smoke passively. 674 subjects (24%) were passively exposed to water pipe smoke during during pregnancy. The prevalence of low birth weight was 5.9 percent, and the mean (±SD) of birth weight was 3247.2(±543.2). The birth weight was not statistically different regarding the water pipe smoking status, but the time of onset of water pipe smoking showed a deleterious effect on birth weight so those starting at the first trimester had a lower birth weight (3215gr versus to 3447gr). The most potent predictor of LBW was a positive history of previous LBW (adjusted OR = 6.19; CI 95% 4.19-9.15). Using multiple linear regression, and controlling for the baseline variables the adjusted mean of birth weight in water pipe smokers and nonsmokers were not statistically different [3260.5 (±175.8) and 3246.1(±538.1), respectively]. The correlation coefficient between the frequency of water pipe smoking and birth weight in the water pipe smokers was -0.21 (p=0.01).